Chelation Therapy

Chelation therapy is a process involving the use of chelating agents to remove heavy metals from the body. For the most common forms of heavy metal intoxication, those involving lead, arsenic or mercury, the standard of care in the US dictates the use of DMSA.

EDTA treatment has been around since the 1940’s, when it was developed to treat lead poisoning.
Chelation is a chemical process in which a substance is used to bind molecules, such as metals or minerals, and hold them tightly so that they can be removed from a system, such as the body. In medicine, chelation has been scientifically proven to rid the body of excess or toxic metals. For example, a person who has lead poisoning may be given chelation therapy in order to bind and remove excess lead from the body before it can cause damage.
In the case of EDTA chelation therapy, the substance that binds and removes metals and minerals is EDTA (ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid), a synthetic, or man-made, amino acid that is delivered intravenously (through the veins). EDTA was first used in the 1940s for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. EDTA chelation removes heavy metals and minerals from the blood, such as lead, iron, copper, and calcium, and is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in treating lead poisoning and toxicity from other heavy metals. Although it is not approved by the FDA to treat CAD, some physicians and alternative medicine practitioners have recommended EDTA chelation as a way to treat this disorder.

EDTA chelation therapy and side effects
When used as approved by the FDA (at the appropriate dose and infusion rate) for treatment of heavy metal poisoning, chelation with EDTA has a low occurrence of side effects. The most common side effect is a burning sensation experienced at the site where the EDTA is delivered into the veins. Rare side effects can include fever, hypotension (a sudden drop in blood pressure), hypocalcemia (abnormally low calcium levels in the blood), headache, nausea, vomiting, and bone marrow depression (meaning that blood cell counts fall). Injury to the kidneys has been reported with EDTA chelation therapy, but it is rare. Other serious side effects can occur if EDTA is not administered by a trained health professional.

 

Massage Therapy – manipulating muscles soft tissues

Massage therapy is a practice that dates back thousands of years. There are many types of massage therapy; all involve manipulating the muscles and other soft tissues of the body. In the United States, massage therapy is sometimes part of conventional medicine. In other instances, it is part of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This Backgrounder provides a general overview of massage therapy used as CAM and suggests some resources you can use to learn more.

Types of massage
Anma – Traditional Japanese Massage
Introduced to Japan about 1300 years ago. Shiatsu massage grew out of this rich tradition. Anma is deep tissue work using no oils and is based on kneading movements.

Ayurvedic Abhyanga Massage
Ayurveda is Practiced in India for more than 5,000 years, ayurvedic tradition holds that illness is a state of imbalance among the body’s systems that can be detected through such diagnostic procedures as reading the pulse and observing the tongue. Nutrition counseling, massage, natural medications, meditation and other modalities are used to address a broad spectrum of ailments. Ayurvedic Massage, also known as Abhyanga is usually performed by two therapists working in harmony, using a heated blend of specially selected herbal oils.

Barefoot Deep Tissue
Barefoot Deep Tissue is a blend of Eastern barefoot techniques with Western manual medicine. the therapist apply a broad range of pressure with ease and does not have to strain, more effort and concentration can be used to sense and manipulate tissue, release fascia, as well as search for and attack trigger points and other problems, regardless of client’s size or build.

Bowen therapy
Bowen Technique involves a rolling type movement over fascia, muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints.

Cachunga Massage- Traditional Persian Massage
Cachunga introduced to the Achaemenid Empire of ancient Persia by Darius the 8th. This is a massage that primarily focuses on the breasts of females. Cachunga is a deep tissue massage used with oil. It is based on a fondling motion, and is usually performed in the direction of the heart to promote circulation.

Chair massage
Chair massage, also known as corporate massage, can be a convenient method of massage therapy. Chair massage promotes better circulation, muscle stimulation and stress relief. This form of massage reduces tension in the back, neck, shoulders, head, arms, hands, legs or feet, providing a deep relaxation effect. A chair massage session typically lasts 10-25 minutes, and is performed while fully clothed.

Chinese Zhi Ya massage
Zhi Ya is a form of Chinese massage based on acupressure. It is similar to Tui Na massage except it focuses more on pinching and pressing at acupressure points.

CranioSacral therapy
CranioSacral Therapy is a gentle, hands-on method of evaluating and enhancing the functioning of a physiological body system called the craniosacral system.

Deep muscle therapy
Deep muscle therapy aims to restore the circulation with its healing properties to the cellular level. Deep muscle therapy (by Therese Pfrimmer) emphasizes specific set of movements applied to all muscles and concentrating on all layers of the muscle that have become depleted of their regular blood and lymphatic flow. Deep muscle therapy is also used to treat the ailments like carpal tunnel syndrome, neck and back pain, headaches, poor circulation, whiplash, and more.

Deep tissue massage
In Deep tissue massage the practitioner can access deeper layers of the soft tissue for more focused massage work with a specific joint, muscle or muscle group.

Effleurage
Effleurage consists of long, flowing or gliding strokes, performed with open hands. In many massage sessions, effleurage is used as the initial type of stroking, as it has a calming effect when performed slowly. Effleurage is usually performed in the direction of the heart to promote circulation and lymphatic drainage.

Esalen Massage
Esalen Massage is combined with the bodywork approach developed by Charlotte Selver, which emphasizes the deeply relaxing and emotional responses of the body when a conscious, structured and pleasant touch is applied. In addition, gentle rocking of the body, passive joint exercises and deep structural work on the muscles and joints, together with an energetic balancing of the body.

Foot or sole massage
Foot massage as practiced by the Chinese is performed in the context of chi. Each spot on the sole of the foot corresponds to an internal organ, and the applied therapy is healing to one’s overall well being. The theory behind foot massage maintains that the ailment of an internal organ will be associated with the nerve ending on the sole of the foot.

Fur massage
Fur massage is an ancient touch healing therapy in which couples therapists employ fur massage to focus patients’ attention on the importance of touch and to sensitize specific areas of the skin. Holistic spas use fur massage to stimulate the lymphatic system by exciting the skin.

Hot Stone Massage
In Hot Stone Massage, heated stones are used as a tool for healing. The application of heat to the body and the relaxing effects this has on muscles and the nervous system has been recognized by numerous ancient civilizations.

>Indian Head Massage
The art of Indian Head Massage is an Ayurvedic form of healing and relaxation which is used widely in Asia to relieve tension and stress. The Indian Head Massage harmonizes the body’s natural balance, helping to promote physical and psychological wellbeing.
Lomilomi — Traditional Hawaiian Massage
Lomilomi massage is an ancient art from the Hawaiian healing specialists.
Maalish
Maalish is also called ‘champi’, a rough form of massage practicsed in India. It is many times performed by the barber after a haircut on the head, shoulders and neck.

MA-URI massage
MA-URI has its roots in Hawaiian Lomi-Lomi Nui dance and it is created by Hemi Hoani Fox in 1990. MA-URI increased so-called energy flow within the body and mind.

Mayan abdominal massage
Mayan abdominal massage originated in Latin America. Mayan abdominal massage mainly involves abdomen region. Mayan abdominal massage helps to improve digestion, correct digestion related problems, and to help the reproductive organs.

Muscle Energy Technique (MET)
Muscle Energy Technique (MET) is one of the techniques used by sports massage therapists.

Myofascial Release
Myofascial release frees fascial restrictions, and allow the muscles to move efficiently. Myofascial release is usually done by applying shear, compression or tension in various directions, or by skin rolling. This is one of the techniques used by sports massage therapists and physical therapists.

Myoskeletal alignment technique
MAT was developed by Erik Dalton. Myoskeletal Alignment Technique (MAT) identifies postural distortions to improve and prevent pain conditions. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) and myofacial techniques are used to lengthen tight/facilitated muscles while fiber activation techniques tone weak/inhibited muscles.

Neuromuscular therapy
NMT was developed in the 1930’s by Dr. Stanley Leif. Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT) is used for pain relief and specific problems. Structural and postural imbalances are identified through an initial postural assessment.

Petrissage
Petrissage is one of the five basic strokes of a Swedish massage. Petrissage warms tissue for deeper work, increases circulation, supply of nutrients and oxygen to muscle, softens superficial fascia, decreases muscle tension, and restoring mobility by decreasing adhesion.

Roman Massage
At the Roman Baths, bathers would be rubbed with oil(s) and then massaged by a specialised slave.

Rolfing
Rolfing is a massage technique using deep manipulation of the fascia (connective tissue) to restore the body’s natural alignment. Rolfing enhances vitality and well-being.
Scalp massage
It is mainly practiced in India and Hong Kong in barber shops.

Shantala massage
Shantala massage was introduced into Western society by Dr. Frederique Leboyer, the renowned French obstetrician, in a book “Loving Hands: The Traditional Art of Baby Massage”. Shantala massage is an ancient Indian massage technique with a rhythmic character, given to massage babies and children.

Shiatsu
Shiatsu is the most widely known form of acupressure, shiatsu has been used in Japan for more than 1,000 years to treat pain and illness and for general health maintenance.

Soft Tissue Therapy includes The Assessment, Treatment and Management of Soft Tissue Injury, Pain and Dysfunction. Soft Tissue Therapy is one of the techniques used by sports massage therapists.
Sports Massage and Sports Therapy
Sports Massage and Sports Therapy are the fastest growing forms of treatment for athletes for the prevention of injuries, enhancing performance and in rehabilitation.

Stone massage
In Stone massage hot or cold stones are used to massage the body. When heated stones are used muscles relax allowing the massage therapist to work deeper into the muscle without the discomfort of regular deep tissue massage. Sufferers of sinus congestion usually find relief when cold stones are placed on the sinuses. Energy work is sometimes incorporated into Stone Massage. Stones may be placed on key energy points, such as Chakras or meridians, in order to improve energy flow and healing. Mainly in Stone massage basalt or marbles are used.

Structural muscular balancing
In the Structural muscular balancing, the nervous system is triggered to release contractions through compression applied to muscles placed in a shortened position.

Esborrachastinen massage
Esborraschatinen massage is designed to increase circulation and blood flow.

Tai Ji / Tai Chi Massage
Tai Ji Massage
Tai Ji Massage was developed by Richard Wickes, Li Cun De. Tai Ji / Tai Chi Massage is massage using the natural principles of Tai Ji, Yin and Yang to achieve balance in the energies of the body, leading to a healthy mind, body, and spirit.

Thai massage
this form of massage is also known as Thai ancient massage, traditional Thai massage, Thai yoga massage, yoga massage, Thai classical massage, Thai bodywork, passive yoga or assisted yoga. Thai massage usually soothing because of its emphasis on stretching and loosening the body.

Trigger point therapy
Trigger point therapy diminishes migraine pain, mock sciatica, mock carpal tunnel syndrome and other pain syndromes, and other symptoms that may have been misdiagnosed. This work is based upon the trigger point research and manuals of Dr. Janet G. Travell, President Kennedy’s physician.
Sometimes this work is incorporated into other styles of massage therapy such as neuromuscular therapy (NMT) or even Swedish.

Watsu
Is the combination of Water and Shiatsu developed by Harold Dull in his time spent at Harbin Hot Springs, California. The work is done in skin temperature water with both the therapist and practitioner in the water, usually a pool which is between 3.5 ft to 4 ft. (100–120 cm) deep. The work entails much movement in the water and incorporates the activation of the energy lines derived from Shiatsu.

Licenses and Certifications
Licenses or certifications for massage therapists include:
• LMT Licensed Massage Therapist
• LMP Licensed Massage Practitioner
• CMT Certified Massage Therapist
• NCTMB Has met the credentialing requirements (including
passing an exam) of the National Certification
Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork,
for practicing therapeutic massage and bodywork
• NCTM Has met the credentialing requirements (including
passing an exam) of the National Certification
Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork,
for practicing therapeutic massage

Acupuncture- Acupressure

Acupuncture is thought to have originated in China and is most commonly associated with Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Different types of acupuncture (Japanese, Korean, and classical Chinese acupuncture) are practiced and taught throughout the world.  Acupuncture is a technique of inserting and manipulating filiform needles into “acupuncture points” on the body. According to acupuncture theory, this will restore health and well-being, and is particularly good at treating pain.

What is acupuncture?

Acupuncture is one of the oldest, most commonly used medical procedures in the world. Originating in China more than 2,000 years ago. The term acupuncture describes a family of procedures involving stimulation of anatomical points on the body by a variety of techniques.

Disease is understood as a loss of homeostasis among the several systems of function, and treatment of disease is attempted by modifying the activity of one or more systems of function through the activity of needles, pressure, heat, etc. on sensitive parts of the body of small volume traditionally called “acupuncture points” in English, or “xue” in Chinese. This is referred to as treating “patterns of disharmony”.

Chinese medical theory holds that acupuncture works by normalizing the free flow of qi (a difficult-to-translate concept that pervades Chinese philosophy and is commonly translated as “vital energy”) throughout the body. Pain or illnesses are treated by attempting to remedy local or systemic accumulations or deficiencies of qi. Pain is considered to indicate blockage or stagnation of the flow of qi, and an axiom of the medical literature of acupuncture is “no pain, no blockage; no blockage, no pain”.

Treatment of acupuncture points may be performed along the twelve main or eight extra meridians, located throughout the body, or on tender points, called “ashi”. Of the eight extra meridians, only two have acupuncture points of their own. The other six meridians are “activated” by using a master and couple point technique which involves needling the acupuncture points located on the twelve main meridians that correspond to the particular extra meridian. Ten of the main meridians are named after organs of the body (Heart, Liver, etc.), and the other two are named after so called body functions (Heart Protector or Pericardium, and San Jiao). The meridians are capitalized to avoid confusion with a physical organ (for example, we write the “Heart meridian” as opposed to the “heart meridian”). The two most important of the eight “extra” meridians are situated on the midline of the anterior and posterior aspects of the trunk and head. The twelve primary meridians run vertically, bilaterally, and symmetrically and every channel corresponds to and connects internally with one of the twelve Zang Fu (“organs”). This means that there are six yin and six yang channels.

There are three yin and three yang channels on each arm, and three yin and three yang on each leg.

The three yin channels of the hand (Lung, Pericardium, and Heart) begin on the chest and travel along the inner surface (mostly the anterior portion) of the arm to the hand.

The three yang channels of the hand (Large intestine, San Jiao, and Small intestine) begin on the hand and travel along the outer surface (mostly the posterior portion) of the arm to the head.

The three yang channels of the foot (Stomach, Gallbladder, and Bladder) begin on the face, in the region of the eye, and travel down the body and along the outer surface (mostly the anterior and lateral portion) of the leg to the foot.

The three yin channels of the foot (Spleen, Liver, and Kidney) begin on the foot and travel along the inner surface (mostly posterior and medial portion) of the leg to the chest or flank.

The movement of qi through each of the twelve channels is comprised of an internal and an external pathway.

The external pathway is what is normally shown on an acupuncture chart and it is relatively superficial. All the acupuncture points of a channel lie on its external pathway. The internal pathways are the deep course of the channel where it enters the body cavities and related Zang-Fu organs. The superficial pathways of the twelve channels describe three complete circuits of the body.

The distribution of qi through the meridians is said to be as follows (the based on the demarcations in TCM’s Chinese Clock): Lung channel of hand taiyin to Large Intestine channel of hand yangming to Stomach

channel of foot yangming to Spleen channel of foot taiyin to Heart channel of hand shaoyin to Small Intestine

channel of hand taiyang to Bladder channel of foot taiyang to Kidney channel of foot shaoyin to Pericardium

channel of hand jueyin to San Jiao channel of hand shaoyang to Gallbladder channel of foot shaoyang to Liver

channel of foot jueyin then back to the Lung channel of hand taiyin.

What does acupuncture feel like?

Acupuncture needles are metallic, solid, and hair-thin. People experience acupuncture differently, but most feel no or minimal pain as the needles are inserted. Some people are energized by treatment, while others feel relaxed. Improper needle placement, movement of the patient, or a defect in the needle can cause soreness and pain during treatment.  This is why it is important to seek treatment from a qualified acupuncture practitioner.

How might acupuncture work?

Acupuncture is one of the key components of the system of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In the TCM system of medicine, the body is seen as a delicate balance of two opposing and inseparable forces: yin and yang. Yin represents the cold, slow, or passive principle, while yang represents the hot, excited, or active principle. Among the major assumptions in TCM are that health is achieved by maintaining the body in a “balanced state” and that disease is due to an internal imbalance of yin and yang. This imbalance leads to blockage in the flow of qi (vital energy) along pathways known as meridians. It is believed that there are 12 main meridians and 8 secondary meridians and that there are more than 2,000 acupuncture points on the human body that connect with them.

According to the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture (2004), acupuncture may be considered as a complementary therapy for these conditions:

•           Abdominal distention/flatulence*

•           Acute and chronic pain control*

•           Allergic sinusitis *

•           Anesthesia for high-risk patients or patients with previous adverse responses to anesthetics

•           Anorexia

•           Anxiety, fright, panic*

•           Arthritis/arthrosis *

•           Atypical chest pain (negative workup)

•           Bursitis, tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome*

•           Certain functional gastrointestinal disorders (nausea and vomiting, esophageal spasm, hyperacidity, irritable bowel)

•           Cervical and lumbar spine syndromes*

•           Constipation, diarrhea *

•           Cough with contraindications for narcotics

•           Drug detoxification *

•           Dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain *

•           Frozen shoulder *

•           Headache (migraine and tension-type), vertigo (Meniere disease), tinnitus *

•           Idiopathic palpitations, sinus tachycardia

•           In fractures, assisting in pain control, edema, and enhancing healing process

•           Muscle spasms, tremors, tics, contractures*

•           Neuralgias (trigeminal, herpes zoster, postherpetic pain, other)

•           Paresthesias *

•           Persistent hiccups*

•           Phantom pain

•           Plantar fasciitis*

•           Post-traumatic and post-operative ileus *

•           Selected dermatoses (urticaria, pruritus, eczema, psoriasis)

•           Sequelae of stroke syndrome (aphasia, hemiplegia) *

•           Seventh nerve palsy

•           Severe hyperthermia

•           Sprains and contusions

•           Temporo-mandibular joint derangement, bruxism *

•           Urinary incontinence, retention (neurogenic, spastic, adverse drug effect) *

*           Also included in the World Health Organization list of acupuncture indications.

Is acupuncture safe?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved acupuncture needles for use by licensed practitioners in 1996. The FDA requires that sterile, nontoxic needles be used and that they be labeled for single use by qualified practitioners only.

Note: When not delivered properly, acupuncture can cause serious adverse effects, including infections and punctured organs.

Will it be covered by my insurance?

Acupuncture is one of the CAM therapies that are more commonly covered by insurance. However, you should check with your insurer before you start treatment to see whether acupuncture will be covered for your condition and, if so, to what extent. Some insurance plans require preauthorization for acupuncture.

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM): A whole medical system that was documented in China by the 3rd century B.C. TCM is based on a concept of vital energy, or qi, that is believed to flow throughout the body. It is proposed to regulate a person’s spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical balance and to be influenced by the opposing forces of yin (negative energy) and yang (positive energy). Disease is proposed to result from the flow of qi being disrupted and yin and yang becoming unbalanced. Among the components of TCM are herbal and nutritional therapy, restorative physical exercises, meditation, acupuncture, and remedial massage.

Safety and risks in Acupuncture

Because acupuncture needles penetrate the skin, many forms of acupuncture are invasive procedures, and therefore not without risk. Injuries are rare among patients treated by trained practitioners.

Certain forms of acupuncture such as the Japanese Tōyōhari and Shōnishin often use non-invasive techniques, in which specially-designed needles are rubbed or pressed against the skin. These methods are common in Japanese pediatric use.

Other risks of injury from the insertion of acupuncture needles include:

•  Nerve injury, resulting from the accidental puncture of any nerve.

•  Brain damage or stroke, which is possible with very deep needling at the base of the skull.

•  Pneumothorax from deep needling into the lung.

•  Kidney damage from deep needling in the low back.

•  Haemopericardium, or puncture of the protective membrane surrounding the heart, which may occur with needling over a sternal foramen (an undetectable hole in the breastbone which can occur in up to 10% of people.

•  Risk of terminating pregnancy with the use of certain acupuncture points that have been shown to stimulate the production of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and oxytocin.

These risks are slight and can all be avoided through proper training of acupuncturists. For correct perspective, their risk should be compared to the level of side effects of common drugs and biomedical treatment – see below. Graduates of medical schools and (in the US) accreditated acupuncture schools receive thorough instruction in proper technique so as to avoid these events.

Electroacupuncture is a form of acupuncture in which acupuncture needles are attached to a device that generates continuous electric pulses, generating a small electric current that flows between pairs of needles. Another term is Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (PENS).

Auriculotherapy/ Auricular Therapy (Ear Acupuncture)

Auriculotherapy is the stimulation of the auricle of the external ear for the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions in other parts of the body. It is also known as ear acupuncture or auricular acupuncture when the stimulation is achieved by the insertion of acupuncture needles, whereas the term auriculotherapy often refers to electrical stimulation of the surface of ear reflex points. Auriculotherapy is a quick, inexpensive, and non-invasive method of pain control. Ear acupuncture is also used as anesthesia during medical procedures. It is used frequently to help people overcome drug, tobacco, and alcohol addictions, and is used to treat chronic health conditions and diseases.

Meridian A traditional Chinese medicine term for each of the 20 pathways throughout the body for the flow of qi, or vital energy, accessed through acupuncture points.

Qi A Chinese term for vital energy or life force. In traditional Chinese medicine, qi (pronounced “chee”) is believed to regulate a person’s spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical balance, and to be influenced by the opposing forces of yin and yang.

Acupressure

Acupressure is similar to acupuncture, but using finger pressure rather than fine needles on specific points along the body to treat ailments such as tension and stress, aches and pains, menstrual cramps, arthritis.

Acupressure is a form of touch therapy that utilizes the principles of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Acupuncture, dates back to 282 A.D. Acupressure is the non-invasive form of acupuncture, as Chinese physicians determined that stimulating points on the body with massage and pressure could be effective for treating certain problems. Acupoints used in treatment may or may not be in the same area of the body as the targeted symptom. The TCM theory for the selection of such points and their effectiveness is that they work by stimulating the meridian system to bring about relief by rebalancing yin, yang and qi (also spelled “chi”). This theory is based on the paradigm of Traditional Chinese Medicine TCM.

Iridology

Iridology is the study of the iris to diagnose disease. Iridology a diagnostic system based on the premise that every organ has a corresponding location within the iris of the eye.

The important accurate health and wellness information can be accessed by studying the patterns of a person’s iris. Iridologists also claim that, they can access info about physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual aspects of the person’s health. Iridologist interprets patterns, shapes, rings, colors and pigmentation markings, fibers, structures, and changes in the pupil and iris. From iris readings also reveal other data, including energy quotients; internal areas of irritation, degeneration, injury, or inflammation; nutritional and chemical imbalances; accumulation of toxins; life transitions; and subconscious tensions; person’s physical and emotional constitution like, inherited weaknesses and person’s venerability; even information about previous health problems. Iridology is primarily used as a diagnostic tool. As it is not a method of treatment, its practitioners often study other branches of alternative medicine, such as naturopaths, chiropractors, or nutritionists.

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